Health and Wellness

COVID-19 Update & Tips

COVID-19 Update & Tips

Some suggestions for maintaining good health in the face of COVID-19 concerns.

There is reason for concern, but not for panic. For most of us, it will mean some changes to our lives, temporarily. Our main focus can be how to better care for ourselves and those around us. Something we can all get better at. We will be better for it.

  • Wash your hands frequently. Good hand washing consists of wetting and lathering hands with soap. Rubbing soap all over, using a nail brush for stubborn dirt, and then rinsing hands under warm water for at least 20 seconds. The rinsing under warm running water is the most important bit. Dry hands with paper towels. Reusing a damp, cloth towel which may be harbouring germs is best avoided.
  • Consider cutting nails short.
  • Avoid touching face.
  • Take your shoes off at the door of your home. Don’t track whatever is on them around your house.
  • On coming home from work, or being around others, change your clothes. Wash your face and hands.
  • Gargle occasionally through the day. Sip on hot drinks. Use a saline nasal spray a couple of times a day. What we are attempting here, is to change the environment of our mouth and nose to interrupt the replication of germs, by changing the environment. You might consider a salt water gargle after cleaning your teeth too. Keep your mouth and nose clean.
  • Put your bath towels and mats out in the sun and fresh air to dry after every use.
  • Add a light skin brush to your shower routine. It can help improve circulation.
  • Avoid overeating. Cut down on sugary, processed food. Preference fresh food. Drink enough water. Maintain good elimination, like a light sweat with exercise and regular bowel and bladder habits. Get enough rest and relaxation.
  • Think of essential oils on chest and neck, even on the upper lip, if they are not too strong. Eucalyptus, tea tree, peppermint, and lemon myrtle are all good. Some of us remember Vicks Vapor Rub, or Tiger Balm, and eucalyptus steam inhalations as kids. They are still good to use.
  • Wipe down common use surfaces at home and work, several times daily, depending on the frequency of use. Things like, phones, pens, food prep surfaces, door handles, computer keyboards, etc. These may be more important at work.
  • Don’t cough or sneeze on others, and avoid others doing the same to you. If you have any respiratory symptoms, wear a mask to prevent spread.
  • Don’t withdraw. Don’t stop trusting others. Don’t stop volunteering, reaching out to family, friends and neighbours. Stay connected, even if not sharing the same place. Stock up on some things you may need at home in case you need to stay in for a bit. Greed and fear are not good for our health, or our community.

There are members of our community that are more vulnerable at these times. People with

existing health problems, the elderly and front-line health care workers, seem the most susceptible.If that is not you, you surely know someone who is. Friends, family, co-workers, or people we are sharing events with, may all look healthy. But they may also be immune-compromised by invisible conditions like diabetes, heart disease, trauma, and more. It is our shared responsibility to keep others safe, by following good personal health and safety guidelines.

The Chinese have a long recorded history of strategies to cope with epidemics. One of our most influential herbal books from around the turn of the common era was on infectious diseases. Many traditional medical colleagues have been part of the management and treatment response in China. Some hospitals have always been integrated. They are now beginning to share their experience. We have a selection of good herbal formulas for prevention and the treatment of symptoms. Please ask for more information. Greg Bantick would be happy to do online consultations and prescriptions where appropriate.

Keeping our patients safe

What we are doing at the Health and Healing Wellness Clinic

We are doing our best to continue to help all our patients and keep everyone who visits us safe.

We are regularly following the Federal Government Health Department and The Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency updates. We also follow recommendations from our respective National Associations and other reputable medical agencies.

We are following our own health and safety practices in clinic. Things like regular hand washing, which is perhaps the single most useful prevention to spread.

They also include things like wiping treatment table face holes, after every use. We are changing table linen often. Several times a day we are wiping all common use surfaces and equipment. Things like our front counter, eftpos machine, phones, door handles, waiting room table, pens, bathroom sinks and toilets. We have temporarily removed the waiting room toys and magazines to avoid spread.

If you have any respiratory symptoms, please ask for a mask to wear in the waiting room. It is nothing to be ashamed of, and it keeps others safe. Many in Asia do this routinely.

We are encouraging all patients with fever, cough and other possible viral symptoms to speak with a practitioner on the phone first, before coming into the clinic. Fever patients, especially those with other serious health concerns, are recommended to visit a fever clinic and get tested for COVID –19. There is one at the RBWH. This helps our excellent public health team track, and where necessary, to most effectively treat all cases. If you have symptoms, have been around someone diagnosed, get tested and encouraged others you may be concerned for to get tested.

Your ongoing treatment is important for your health and Improving your immunity.

  • Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency - Chinese Medicine Board of Australia
    Greg Bantick has been in practice since 1975 in a wide variety of clinical settings. He has particular interests in dermatology, digestive, mood and auto-immune disorders.



  • Please Note: The information provided on Health and Healing Wellness Centre Website is designed to compliment, not replace, the relationship between a patient and his / her own physician.

    Page last updated 16-Mar-2020

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